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Washington’s NFL franchise changes name

In Washington, D.C., the NFL franchise notes that the nickname it has over the previous 87 years, which is frequently used on the face of the American public, formally retires. “Today, we are announcing we will be retiring the Redskins name and logo upon completion of this review,” the Team said in a statement Monday.

“That review has begun in earnest,” it said. “As part of this process, we want to keep our sponsors, fans, and community apprised of our thinking as we go forward.”

The Team has not clarified the current identity and only said Team owner Dan Snyder and Head Trainer Ron Rivera work closely on creating a new identity and approach to design. Several news organizations like The Washington Post and the Sports Business Journal have said that their staff is focused on labeling issues about its favorite name. The change in the name, although much anticipated, came after the franchise announced on July 3 that they would undergo an in-depth examination of the name of the Team. This analysis formally records the Team’s internal negotiations with the League over the last weeks. Rivera said that he and Snyder were brainstorming alternate names during an interview released on July 4. Warriors and Redtails trended on Twitter late Monday morning, as NFL fans considered potential new titles. Sources from the Team’s preparations on Sunday said that the chosen replacement name was riddled with issues, and the manager did not reveal the new name on Monday.

 

Why this is a big deal

The change completes the rapid transition from the owner of Washington, Dan Snyder, to where the previous owner, George Preston Marshall, first created the nickname, and which it had since 1933. It is so, given the name that has been investigated as racist and derogatory to the Americans in recent years. These arguments have existed for years but have gained tremendous traction in the past month as George Floyd ‘s death has rallied around the country against ethnic injustice.

The tipping point occurred on July 2, when the firm was seen to break its trading relationship with Washington unless it changed its name, a consortium of multinational firms in multi-billion dollar businesses such as FedEx, Nike, PepsiCo and others had come together. The companies and creditors who tried to drive the change of name jointly had a net worth of over 620 billion dollars. Soon after the letter was issued, FedEx released a statement requesting a name change, and Adidas pulled all the products from Washington’s online store.

Snyder has the rights in the field of Washington to the Arena Football League expansion, and the Warriors team would be called, also wanting to identify the name – a search he has abandoned.

 

The Political Aspect of Things

The district’s nonvoting delegate to the House of Representatives, Mayor Muriel E. Bowser of Arlington, and Eleanor Holmes Norton have expressed satisfaction at the Team’s decision. Finally, both of them will become important to Snyder to get a new stadium in town where the District Council and some House members rejected Snyder’s being able to build upon the RFK Stadium. At the same time, the Team was named Redskins, sharing their concerns that the Team could return without changing their names.

Since demonstrations against social injustice and police violence began following George Floyd’s May death in Minnesota, Snyder and the franchises were under more pressure to change Washington ‘s nickname. A few weeks after Floyd died, several sources said that Snyder had discussed the name with the League for several weeks.

The announcement of Monday was celebrated by Ray Halbritter, Oneida ‘s representative and creator of the Mascot Change movement, which called for a change in the name.

In his statement, he said that this is the right decision for the country – not merely for the indigenous people – because it concludes a painful chapter of disregard for Native Americans and other people of color.

Activists argue that the naming of the Washington Squad is the most insulting, and other names that evoke American Native myths. The Atlanta Braves, Chicago Hawks, and Kansas City leaders are also faces that are hoped some advocates will change as the U.S. carries out a racial review following George Floyd ‘s death in police custody.

 

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